FDA Outlines for Consumers What They Need to Know About CBD Products

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FDA Outlines for Consumers What They Need to Know About CBD Products

06/20/2019
hemp plant

SILVER SPRING, Md. — As cannabidiol (CBD) products enter the marketplace at a faster pace, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an update directed at answering some consumer questions.

The agency acknowledged public interest in cannabis and cannabis-derived compounds, particularly CBD. However, it explained "there are many unanswered questions about the science, safety and quality of products containing CBD."

The update follows a public hearing on CBD the FDA held on May 31. The agency will take the feedback from that hearing, plus information and data its gathers through a public comment, to answer those questions, it added.

Public comment is open until July 16.

Though the 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp — defined as cannabis and cannabis derivatives with very low concentrations of THC — the FDA has only approved on prescription drug product containing CBD. It has not approved any other CBD products, and "there is very limited available information about CBD, including about its effects on the body," the agency explained.

The issues raised by agency include:

  • The effects of CBD on the body;
  • The cumulative exposure to CBD if people access it across a broad range of consumer products;
  • The effects of CBD on special populations like the elderly, children or adolescents, or types of animals; and
  • The safety of CBD use in animals including pets.

"The FDA is currently evaluating the regulatory frameworks that apply to certain cannabis-derived products that are intended for non-drug uses, including whether and/or how the FDA might consider updating its regulations, as well as whether potential legislation might be appropriate," the agency said. "The information we have underscores the need for further study and high-quality, scientific information about the safety and potential uses of CBD."

The agency explained it is "committed to sound, science-based policy," adding it is "raising these safety, marketing and labeling concerns with you now because we want you to know what we know."

To read the update, click here.