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06/16/2021

7-Eleven Gives Big Gulp a Bold Refresh

Five new, non-traditional flavors are now part of the fountain lineup.
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7-Eleven Big Gulps

IRVING, Texas — 7-Eleven Inc. is making a big splash with the Big Gulp this summer.

The convenience store chain gave its famous lineup of fountain drinks a bold refresh by introducing five new, non-traditional flavors at participating stores: AHA sparkling flavored water, craft lemonade made with real juice and cane sugar, electrolyte-infused vitaminwater zero squeezed, and 7-Eleven's private brand vitamin-infused sport drink Replenish Zero and energy drink Power Berry by Quake.

"We're excited to offer these new, great-tasting beverages at an equally great value to celebrate people starting to return to their normal daily routines," said Jawad Bisbis, 7-Eleven vice president of proprietary beverages. "Picking up a Big Gulp on the way to class or work or running errands has always been a bright spot in our customer's day. Now, we are proud to offer them choices they aren't used to seeing on the fountain, like refreshing sparkling flavored water and a zero-calorie sports drink."

Details on the fountain newcomers include:

  • AHA Sparkling Water: A flavorful, zero-calorie sparkling water with a refreshing lime and watermelon essence.
  • Craft Lemonade: A refreshing lemonade made with real lemon juice, cane sugar and natural flavors.
  • Replenish Zero: 7-Eleven's popular private brand zero-calorie sport drink comes in an tasty orange-mango flavor and is infused with vitamins A, E, B3, B5 and B6.
  • Power Berry by Quake: Crafted to give an energy boost, 7-Eleven's private brand energy drink has B vitamins, electrolytes and caffeine.
  • vitaminwater zero squeezed: Sweetened with Erythritol and Stevia, this zero-sugar vitamin water beverage is the first zero-sugar enhanced water on the fountain and contains electrolytes, vitamins B, C and E, and minerals.

Irving-based 7Eleven operates, franchises and/or licenses more than 77,000 stores in 16 countries and regions, including 16,000 in North America.